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polarization within the doj civil-rights unit. my next guest works at the doj before he resigned in 2010 over the department's dismissal of a new black panther party boater intimidation case. joining us now, former u.s. to pardon of justice attorney, author of the book in justice exposing the racial agenda of the obama justice department. good to have you with us. >> good to be here. lou: you have to feel vindicated by the doj inspector general's report. let's just share the findings. let me be clear, you have said that peres had provided false testimony. the ig report concludes and are we found the testimony did not reflect the entire story regarding the involvement of political appointees. we did not find press intentionally misled the commission. nevertheless, given he was testifying as an apartment witness before the commission we believe he should have some more details. your reaction? >> look. this is what we have been saying for years about this civil rights division. it has enormous power over business. call that a rat's nest. invested with racial animus. an inspector general report d
luther king memorial in washington. the president, connecting one civil rights and human rights leader to another, it's the melting of history, disconnection, the connection of the civil rights movement. that's the president brought throughout his trip. >> the story of the exodus was perhaps the central story, the most powerful image about emerging from the grip of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity, carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. >> african-americans and jewish americans march with rabbis carrying as they walked. they boarded buses for freedom rights together. they bled together, gave their lives together. >> this is our obligation, not simply to bear witness but to act. for us, in our time, this means confronting bigotry and hatred in all of its forms. >> confronting it in all of its forms all over the world. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> shameless. let's play "hardball". ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. i hated the iraq war, said so when i s
from imprisoned felons. this is a basic civil rights issue and i don't think it's the issue that divides the court. >> joining me now, patricia and head of the supreme court practice. jonathan turley. hello to both of you. welcome. >> hi, alex. >> patricia, i'll begin with you as -- well, let's talk about in terms of prop 8, what we heard just there, correct, i mean, the right to mary already, has it been well-established? >> well, the right to marry is but what the court hasn't grappled with is what is the definition of marriage and that, as we know, is the issue hotly contested in this case and what they will be confronting and in particular what is the role of the courts in that, the role of the states, the role of the federal constitution. so there's much for them to grapple with still. >> jonathan, breakdown for the viewers, if you will, the key issues here for each case. name one key issue for each of them. >> well, first of all, on the threshold level, one is doma, the statute of the defense of marriage act that has formed a discrimination against those who have same-
to the base by habeas lawyers and activists, those working for civil rights. they want to choke information out of guantanamo because it's all bad. >> michael: it seems also, colonel davis, not only is the information bad but this is not been prioritized. i'm wondering, colonel davis how does this become a priority for the president and the administration? it seems that it's a forgotten thing. is this hunger strike going to work? >> i doubt that it will. there have been hunger strikers before. there have been suicide that didn't get a lot of attention. if you look at the drone program. today the president or the white house is rumored to get the ca out of the drone business because the public is in such an uproar. so it's going to take the public standing up and saying, look, this is not in our interest to waste this money on guantanamo, and we need to close it down. >> michael: colonel morris davis, colonel david remes. thank you for sharing your expertise and insights with us. when we come back, we've been talking about guantanamo for 11, 12 years now we still can't seem to talk about gun
, reporting live. >>> it is the civil rights issue of our time. same-sex marriage. the supreme court begins hearing arguments next week. coming up, we'll talk about whether political pressure will weigh on the justices. [ female announcer ] new york strips. sudden trips. mr. wiggles and curling irons. for the little mishaps you feel, use neosporin to help you heal. it kills germs so you heal four days faster neosporin. also try neosporin eczema essentials. all your important legal matters in just minutes. protect your family... and launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. and launch your dreams. today is gonna be an important day for us. you ready? we wanna be our brother's keeper. what's number two we wanna do? bring it up to 90 decatherms. how bout ya, joe? let's go ahead and bring it online. attention on site, attention on site. now starting unit nine. some of the world's cleanest gas turbines are now powering some of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price"
the civil rights movement and because of the history of america and because he said several crucial phrases, essentially said that israel will never go away. so he sort of laid out the honey, then he went and gave the vinegar line saying you have to actually now do a few things you don't like, and here they are. he did a good job from the israeli critics' perspective. >> the palestinians aren't happy, the disproportionate amount of time in israel and what he asked of the two leaders, made no public demand of netanyahu yet in israel he talked about the settlement issue. it is different than four years ago, on the arab street, including ra mal a, thought it would be different. now the israelis think we understand each other better here. >> one thing the president succeeded doing, strategically very important, john, the president set up a phone call between the prime minister of israel and the leader of turkey, the prime minister, and they both agreed turkey, a nate oh ally, israel a close ally, they were going to try to normalize the relationship. it is important for the region and the u.s. a
's an astounding thing. never in the history of any civil rights movement have we come so far so fast. and, i would say, even if we achieve full marriage equality and all of the other equal status of citizenship in this country, there would be work to be done. let's remember that when we got the jim crow laws off of the books in the signatures for african-americans, it didn't mean the end of racism. and there will still be anti-gay feeling and sentiment in the country that will need to be worked on. but getting the laws in order, that is an important step forward. >> these are all signs of just about every sector of the economy, young people, older people? >> that's right. >> businesses, you know academics, whatever action recognizing that this is an issue whose time has come. right? >> that's right. we've got, i think it's 81% of young people. >> 81%. >> favors same-sex marriage. you know, it's interesting, too, if the republican party is interested in appealing to them young people do not want to be associated with any group, whether it be a religious group
says he thinks his side will win and it won't be close since he says, marriage is a civil right. >> we are not asking for a new constitutional right. the constitutional right to marry is well established. in fact, the supreme court has ruled you can't take away the right to marry, even from imprisoned felons who can't have procreation because they can't get together. but you can't take it away because it's so important, it's a fundamental right of liberty. >> there could be fireworks. there won't be cameras present, but we will get same-day audios to hear how everything goes down. >> it's always interesting. because we get the transcripts fwowrks hear the inflection and the voice, always interesting, so, we will have it. >> yes, we will. >> in the next hour, we will have a fair and balanced debate with two key players in the same cases. the head of the national organization for marriage and the national campaign director for the freedom to marry. where do you stand on the two same-sex marriage cases? tweet us your answers. we will read your responses, later on in this show. they came t
the civil rights movement live saturday at 8 p.m. eastern, part of booktv this weekend on c-span 2. difference striking between what is happening today and 100 years ago is the columnist of the parade. 100 years ago, the parade was not a parade, so much as a riot. the police refuse to protect the marchers. as they progressed, the crowds got larger and larger. they were very unruly. they had been drinking. they started to throw things at the women. they shouted and told them to go home. not just that, streetcars continued to him see people into the packed crowd the crowd got larger and larger and more aggressive. the women could not go forward. the police were not involved. the secretary of defense called out the calvary to push back the unruly crowd so that the women could continue their peaceful exercise of their first amendment rights. today, this is a wonderful peaceful assembly and as a liberation of how far have come in 100 years. >> this weekend, a look at the centennial celebration of the women's suffrage parade that took place on pittsylvania avenue in march, 1913 sunday at
. this is not democracy. this is not freedom. >> right. >> what is it? >> what it is is first of all we set this thing up to where we supported the shiites and the sunnis are now -- there is going to be a version of a civil war. right now, as we speak here live on cnn there is an alternate reality on another network. they are over there today saying how great it is. iraq's free. >> you mean fox. >> yes. i don't really want to, you know, disparage. >> let me read this tweet from donald rumsfeld. the iraqis deserve our respect and appreciation. >> he's a war criminal as far as i'm concerned. i don't understand why he, bush, cheney are walking the streets. the way they are trying to revise history saying it was a mistake or we were given bad information. say nobody sent me an e-mail or a tweet that said goldman sachs downtown right now in their basement they havethey are holding them there. i tell the police this. what will happen to me when they go down to goldman sachs and find no kids many n the basement? of course, you would think i would want to go after goldman sachs as bush wanted to go after saddam.
and the sewnries -- now there's going to be a version of a civil war. right now as we speak here live on cnn, there's an alternate reality taking place on another network, and they are over there today saying how great it is. iraq's free. >> you mean fox. >> i don't really want to disparage them by name. >> donald rumsfeld, ten years ago, became long difficult work, all who played a role in history deserve our respect and appreciation. >> well, he's a war criminal as far as i'm concerned. i don't understand why he, bush, cheney, wolfowitz are still walking the street. the way they are trying to revise history now is by saying, well, it was a mistake or we were given bad information. you know, let's say somebody sent a tweet to us right now or sent me an e-mail that said goldman sachs downtown right now in their basement, they have kidnapped children, and they are holding them there, and i then tell the police this. what will happen to me when they go down to goldman sachs and find out that there's actually no kids kidnapped in the basement of goldman sachs, and, of course, you would think i would w
of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity -- a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations, this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution, while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me, personally, growing up in far-flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a home. [applause] of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle, just like previous generations. it means us working through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed, "i may not get there with you. but i want you to know that we, as a people, will get to the promised land." (applause.) so just as joshua carried on after moses, the work goes on for all of you, the joshua generat
for liberty and human dignity. a tale that was carried from slavery and the civil rights movement into today. for generations that helped people persevere and holding on to hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally, growing up in different parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke for a yearning for every human being for home. [applause] of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and the gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also now that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle. just like previous generations have. it means us working through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed "i may not get there with you, but i want you to know we as a people will get to the promise land." [applause] so just as joshua carried on after moses, the work goes on for all of you, the joshua generation for justice and dignity and opportunity and freedom. for the jewish peop
that government forces committed human rights abuses at the end of the civil war. >> they should have taken -- without doing all that. they're just issue a report, one-sided, biased report i would say. >> reporter: rajapaksa said a government committee is continuing to investigate the allegations. the world will be watching the efforts of the rebuilding after a long and bitter civil war. nhk world. >> and that wraps up our bulletin. i'm cholaphansa narula in bangkok. >>> emerging economic powers struggling, citizens demanding democracy. get news live fron bangkok. >>> hi, it's been a beautiful day today, also here in tokyo, we have not missed out on the sunshine. 25 degrees today, that's what we normally see in may, not march. tomorrow it will be a different story. this was the scene today, robert speta took these pictures on his way to the park. you see here that the cherry blossom is out, and people will take to the parks and have parties under the trees, but if you're planning it for tomorrow, i urge you to reconsider. we have two storms coming in from the south of china, and that will b
is not a religious right. it is a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not have a right to marry someone, except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage licenses. the government decides who gets married in two dozen. so in 1967 there was a supreme court case, loving v. virginia, and blacks couldn't marry whites. they challenged that and the supreme court ruled that nine nothing. it was, they have ruled now 14 times about the fundamental right to marriage. from a legal standpoint there is no argument. you can make a moral standpoint if you want, but from a legal standpoint there is no argument. so we feel confident that i'm an outcome how broadly the supreme court will rule? that we don't know. >> tomorrow the nation's highest court hears oral arguments challenging california's proposition eight, a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage in that state. c-span and c-span radio will have live coverage beginning at 1 p.m. eastern. the arguments along with reaction will play again on c-span tomorrow night at 8 p.m. eastern. on wednesday th
of democracy and human rights and civil society, outside its own borders now for 200 years, just took on anmpossible taskn iraq. it just wasn't going to acceptst that. and i would say much more likely than that the american-- tank american influence will be incremental improvements in what is now a pretty dire situation, is that it's very likely to get worse, and lead to civil war, and it's not even clear that the most fundamental issue:00 is who governs in iraq, the majority shi'a, or the minority sunni, it's not even clear that that's, a settled issue, and if isn't a settled issue, and the sunnise prevail inyriand back theirl brothers across the borders of iraq and anbar, you may very well see a civil war, at least as brutal as we were witnessing in 2007 at the time time of the surge. >> rose: we will come back to manies thof point. >> or beloved late friend richard holbrooke once asked me. what did i think? what was my sounded bite about this war. i said we will did due course learn whether it was an open success or -- >> noble. >> he object toltd notification of noble failure.ct h
, it felt like a return to the worst days of the insurgency and the civil war. dozens of injured people have been brought to hospitals like this right across baghdad. normally, this road would have been absolutely crammed with traffic, but people are staying home today. there is a real fear that more bombs could happen, a fear that people have grown used to for the last 10 years. >> on this night in 2003, the hammer blows of the american attack started what turned into a decade of insurgency and civil war. opinion polls at the time indicated that half the iraqi people in this deeply divided country welcomed the invasion while the other half were bitterly angry. a lot of that anger is still around. this is a place that's tends to attract riders and intellectual -- writers and intellectuals. it was bombed. the owner lost four of his sons and a grandson. >> the invasion has not been a success at all. it has held us back 100 years. it has destroyed me and my family, who have become widowed and orphan. >> it is only a mile away, but here, the customers are young and very different. the facebook c
in southern afghanistan and eastern afghanistan. the same was true in the period after the destructive civil war for a costly war from 2006 to 2008. iraqis began together -- iraqis came together. >> a gentleman right here. >> ticket. -- thank you. since the president is taking his first foreign trip to the middle east, how do you see his policy and can he achieve something in his second term? >> i'm hoping to keep the focus on the big question before us, which is the lessons of a decade of war. general that the mentioned how war does not often turn out the way you want it to, as the air battle concept would be too much towards. how owards that direction, did that shift resources away from europe and asia in the 2000's? >> you said regarding one of the, with in history, 3 packets of a regime but they were doing this for 3 decades. it's only in the end that the u.s. learned of weapons. the regime was brutal all the time. >> we have the whole world on a table. onhow has our expenditures iraq affected our ability to operate elsewhere? the united states is the number one superpower. we have the l
- based privacy standards to ensure that individual rights and civil liberties are protected. >> thank you. i will submit a question for the record. i would appreciate if you would respond. you talked about supreme court cases regarding the of aerialonality surveillance. do you believe that body of supreme court cases are adequate for guarding the courts and law enforcement in the area of unmanned surveillance? i think theyure are adequate for purposes of man surveillance. with unmanned surveillance, there is an additional danger that as costs go down you see more. i am not sure that they are adequate. they need to be updated. >> inc. you very much. >> the supreme court has held observations made by while following a maned aircraft over a person's property does not violate the fourth amendment. conductere allowed to surveillance over private property at heights ranging from 400 feet to 1000 feet. low must a joan fly over a low mustrophecy -- hwopow prorone fly over private perty. were to if a drone trespass, that would trigger the fourth amendment. it used to be that you own all of the air
marriage and opposes changing ohio's constitution to allow for civil unions. well, so much for that. and he's far from the first republican to feel the heat from the fringe. joining me right now is msnbc contributor ron reagan and errol lewis. first, i'll comment on that one. kasich is a fine guy, a bit of a maverick and he's had a tough life in many ways and he says what comes to mind and he's thinking out loud and he says you know what? i'm not ready to go all of the way on my position, but civil union, i can live with that and civil you know knows and he said it again and within hours his flack comes out with a written statement to make sure it's getting picked up saying he didn't say what we heard him just say, ron. what's going on here? >> he gave is straight. he seemed to demonstrate that on the one hand he doesn't really have a position that he is susceptible to pressure from the right and he also demonstrated and this is relevant to the republican party as a whole that he's way behind the curve of history now. the public, as a whole is moving in a pretty clear wye this issue and mr.
. ohio governor john kasich said he's in civil unions. one day later the staffer said he didn't mean that. what? he did mean it, he wasn't allowed to say it. in today's gop, if you're not far right, you're wrong. also we learned today that newt gingrich and rick santorum secretly talked about forming a massive ticket. what happened? big surprise. they couldn't agree on who was going to be president and who was going to be vice president. tonight, a great story of political mating and eventually cold feet. >>> plus it's hard for michelle obama, or michele bachmann to top herself and she's done it not once, but twice this week, including that obama care, love this word, is killing people. remember the death squads and death panels. she's back with them again. michele bachmann pants on fire fact check coming later in the show. let me talk about the fringe right to know even a smidgen of history. this is "hardball" the place for politics. omnipotent of opportu. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the ais
start heading out of baghdad and go to damascus. once the civil war began in iraq and sunnis and shiites started to fight and american troops were caught in the quagmyre, there was invincibility that started to break. right now we are in a situation where events are taking place so quickly, the united states is not a factor right now. the u.s. looked weak in iraq and now in egypt and libya and syria, the rebels and revolutionary movements that are trying to become stable democratic movements or stable islamic movements are operating at a pace that is not 1 that the united states is controlling. if you look back from the start of the iraq war, you can see a decline in american influence in the region. >> just today there is over 50 iraqis killed and sectarian violence andry that is very much divided. there is some worry on the ground that maliki is saddam husseinesque and putting the fear among sunni groups and he can turn on them at any time. from what you know, what is the common day to day in a place like iraq. especially the major cities like those places that saw so much violence. wh
because "gay rights are human rights." during the 2008 campaign they maintained she supported civil unions but not gay marriage. polls show a majority of americans support same-sex marriage. president obama reversed his opposition to it last year. >>> and now for a look at what's trending today, our quick roundup of what has you talking online a dramatic day in court made actress lindsay lohan a top google search. she reached a last-minute deal in los angeles and pleaded no contest stemming from a car crash last june. instead of 90 days in jail she will be at a rehab facility. >>> lisa rinna made her lips a top search item on bing and yahoo! talking about them with hoda monday. she first had her lips injected 25 years ago but had a doctor remove as much material as he could a few years ago. take a listen. >> would you do it again or just leave your lips the way you had them before. >> i would do it again. >> why? >> because this is like my career has been all about, i never had a career before i had the lips. so my lips have had their own career. >> rinna talked about her current stint on
and created to kill people is hard for a civilized community to explain that. that's where we need the churches, the synagogues and the moral people, because common sense does not just foy what we're going through. >> is he right in we have seen other issues where churches have made a difference. could they, if they're able to motivate more religious groups to get involved? >> well the religious groups i know are very pro gun. guns are very personal. i'm a gun owner, an enthusiast and i do all of the above. it's constitutional second amendment constitutional right for most people. that's how they see it. this is very personal on both sides. and when you have a personal issue it's blurred in the middle on who talks about ought the maic weapons. we're talking about semi-automatic weapons. and the facts get blurred in the whole question. >> to be continued as we wait and see this go to the floor. thank you so much. and the gun control debate will be the focus of this sunday's meet the press. that should be an interesting conversation. meantime, a stunning turn in the investigation int
and marriage used to be sacrosanct, untouchable, not a very long ago. now no one talks about civil unions anymore. >> you don't hear as much about it. there's still a divide. about two-thirds of people say they'd favor fully equal rights for same-sex couples as heterosexual couples but support for actual gay marriage is lower than that across any different polling. so there is still a gap there. i think the issue has shifted in a way it's been argued on both sides. that this seemed to be maybe a safe middle ground or steppingstone towards marriage for some people i think a lot of advocates don't see it that way, that it's now defining it as something different than marriage is not what they want to see happen. >> ifill: when you define it as being legal versus illegal is that different than saying the right -- the sacrament of marriage? do you ask the question differently that way do you get different answers? >> you do. and that suggests there are people torn over this. we find a majority of people say they think gay marriage goes against their religious belief but a majority also says t
to try to bring about a resolution in syria that the rights and the safety and security of all regardless of whatever lines divide syria. this is not easy. when you start seeing a civil war and you have a repressive government that is intent on you haveng power, missed trust that has broken and there is an opposition that has not have the opportunity our time to both politically and militarily, then you see the devastation you have been seeing. we're doing everything we can to prevent it. i know the vast majority of international art nurse feel the same way. >> from the white house press corps. reuters. >> thank you. there were some friendly banter between the two of you on the tarmac. how much of a serious matter did that become in talks? president obama has said it will take iran at least a year to build a bomb. the is much longer than prime minister believes. mr. president, are you asking the prime minister to be more patient and hold off for at least a year on military action against iran? esther prime minister, has president obama's words convince thethat he is putting forth military
, this will be a discussion about where they see the civil war in syria heading. and what the chaos in syria heading and what the chaos could mean for the rest of the region. >> all right, thank you so much for that report live from jerusalem. >>> our coverage of the president's mideast visit does not end here. more live reports from jerusalem later on "america this morning" as well as "good morning america," and you can find additional background on abcnews.com. >>> the pentagon has called a halt to the use of 60 millimeter mortar shells. seven marines killed. several others injured during exercises deep in the nevada desert. investigators trying to figure out white a mortar round fired in the firing tube during the exercise. >>> dramatic new details of the massacre plot averted on the university of central florida campus. police say the gunman had planned to pull the fire alarm and then start shooting as students rushed out of their dorms. that plot was stopped when his roommate called 911 and faced that gunman down. >> he made eye contact with me when he pulled the gun on m
philosophical foundation to the law of a civilization. >> just to be precise if you believe life begins at conception which i suspect you do you would have no exceptions for rape, incest, the life of the mother is that right? >> i think that once again puts things in too small of a box. what i would say is there are thousands of exceptions. i'm a physician and every individual case is going to be different. everything is going to be particular to that individual case and what is going won that mother and the medical circumstances of that mother. i would say after birth we've decided when life begins we don't have exceptions for one-day-olds or 6 mnlds. we don't ask where they came from or how they came into being but it is more complicated because the rest begidepends on definition of life and when it begins. i've been there at the beginning of life. i've held one-pound babies in my hand that i examined their eyes. i've been there at the end of life. there are a lot of decisions made privately by families and doctors that really won't, the law won't apply to but i think it is important
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)